• Español (Arg)
  • Portugués (Bra)

Tips for your Trip to Mérida

  • Wear light-weight, comfortable and light-colored cotton clothing, such as shorts or bermudas, since Mérida is quite warm most of the year.
  • Wear comfortable and closed shoes or tennis shoes to be best prepared to walk (especially in archaeological sites). When visiting beaches and cenotes, sandals are recommended.
  • Do not forget your biodegradable sun block, cap or hat to protect you from the sun, insect repellent and bottled water to prevent dehydration.
  • Avoid exposure to direct sunlight for long periods of time. In the event of extreme sunburn, request medical attention.
  • Yucatán is characterized for its traditional food, so be careful when ordering meals if you are not familiar with condiments. Ask your waiter for recommendations.
  • Mérida is a safe city. However, be cautious at all times to ensure a pleasant and productive experience.

OTHER USEFUL RECOMMENDATIONS

Currency

The Mexican peso is the official currency ($). The peso is subdivided in 100 centavos, which come in coins of 10, 20 and 50 centavos. Larger denomination coins are 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 pesos, although the latter is no longer widely accepted.

Peso bills or notes come in the following denominations: 20, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1,000 pesos. Their design and staggered sizes make them easier to identify. The $100 bills and higher denominations have a security element which changes color and a chain of snails of the same color. The $20 and $50 notes have a little transparent window, and are made of polymer, while all others are paper.

For exchange rates, please consult: http://www.banxico.org.mx/portal-mercado-cambiario/index.html

Calculator / Currency converter: http://www.cambiodolar.mx/

Current bills and coins

20 Pesos

20 Pesos

50 Pesos, new design

50 Pesos, new design

50 Pesos

50 Pesos

100 Pesos

100 Pesos

100 Pesos commemorative

100 Pesos commemorative

200 Pesos

200 Pesos

200 Pesos commemorative

200 Pesos commemorative

500 Pesos

500 Pesos

1000 Pesos

1000 Pesos



5 Centavos

5 Centavos

10 Centavos

10 Centavos

20 Centavos

20 Centavos

50 Centavos

50 Centavos

1 Peso

1 Peso

2 Pesos

2 Pesos

5 Pesos

5 Pesos

10 Pesos

10 Pesos

20 Pesos

20 Pesos


Where to Exchange Currency

Banks, hotels, international airports and exchange bureaus are the place to go. US dollars are accepted at all exchange bureaus, as well as Canadian dollars and Euros, among others. Exchange bureaus usually offer faster service and longer working hours than banks. They display signs indicating “Purchase Value” and “Sale Value” for each currency they deal with. At the time of exchanging, please consider not only the rate offered but also any applicable commissions. These are usually charged as a percentage of the amount to be exchanged, subject to a minimum charge for low amount transactions. Some exchange bureaus do not charge commissions but frequently offer less favorable exchange rates. Make sure they are lawful bureaus.

Foreigners may exchange US dollars in cash or in traveler´s checks at banks by only showing their original passport and providing a photocopy of it to the bank.

Tips

In Mérida, tipping is a courtesy, and is normally 10% of the bill.

Electricity and Communications

Power in Mexico is 127 volts, 60Hz, so please check your electronic devices to make sure. Plugs and outlets are type A / B, as illustrated below:

Enchufe 1
Type A: Japanese A-type plugs. May be used in the United States, but not always vice versa.
Enchufe 2
Type B: Sometimes valid for A-type plugs.


You can use your electronic devices in Mexico provided that the voltage in your country ranges between 110V and 127V (like, USA, Canada and most South American countries). If your voltage is 220V - 240V (Spain, United Kingdom, Australia and most Asian and African countries), you will need a converter or transformer while in Mexico. To make sure, check the label on your device. If 'INPUT' indicates 100-240V, 50/60 Hz', your electronic device may be used anywhere in the world for Tablet chargers, laptops, cameras, cell phones or electric tooth brushes.

Communications in Mexico are diverse and sufficient: public telephony, cellular and satellite. Broad-band Internet is available almost anywhere in the country and WiFi can be found in most major cities.

Vaccines to Travel to Mexico

No vaccines are mandatory to travel to Mexico, but it is worth checking, just like for any international travel, particularly to areas of lush vegetation.

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